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Techniques to Cut a Hedge

Author : Elizabeth Huston789
Publish Date : 2021-04-19 09:36:08
Techniques to Cut a Hedge

Most hedges need to be trimmed after planting, and then cut twice annually; in spring and late summer. A formal hedge, however, should be clipped more regularly to maintain its form.

A lot of deciduous plants, particularly those with a naturally bushy, low-branching habit should be cut back by one third on planting, as should the evergreens box and shrubby honeysuckle. The very vigorous and upright growers, such as hawthorn and privet, can be cut back to 15 cm (6 in). The year after, each one of these species ought to be clipped lightly, and then cut back by one-third in their second winter. Once the hedge has attained the desired size, trim it back yearly to within 6 mm (1/2 in) of the old wood.

Leyland cypress along with other vigorous conifers are used broadly as hedges. Generally speaking, trim only their side-shoots in the early years, leaving the leading shoots untouched. The most vigorous species may need trimming two or three times in the growing season. Once the leading (apical) shoots have reached the desired height, trim them level to produce a flat-topped, wider-growing hedge.

Many flowering hedges flower on last year's wood, and so may be cut back after flowering. Nevertheless, Japanese rose (Rosa rugosa) ought to be cut back hard in late winter or early spring. Fruiting hedges, such as pyracantha and cotoneaster, may be lightly trimmed either before or after flowering.

Close-leaved evergreen hedges, which do not allow light and rainwater to pass through easily, are best cut to a batter; that is, slightly narrower at the top than bottom. Consequently light can reach the lower areas of the hedge, preventing browning and shedding of the leaves on lower limbs.

 

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Equipment

It's very tough to judge precisely by eye while you are trimming a hedge; it is only when you have finished that any mistakes become obvious. Strings attached to four posts or canes, one at each corner of the hedge and set at the height required, will give a cutting line and help to manage a straight edge.

Most hedges are cut with shears or an electric trimmer, although informal hedges and those with large evergreen leaves ought to, wherever practical, be pruned with secateurs to prevent unsightly damage to the leaves. You should wear heavy-duty gloves and safety glasses when trimming evergreens.

Mains-powered hedge-trimmers must be used with care; they could be incredibly dangerous if mishandled. Always use a 'residual current device' at the socket to cut back the danger of electrocution should you cut the cable. Try and use a hedgetrimmer with a blade stopping time of a maximum of half a second, and a two-handed switch, where the cutter is only going to work when both hands are on it. You can minimise the chance of a hand coming into contact with the blades by utilizing blade extensions. If you have a high and broad hedge you might need 60 cm (24 in) blades; in any other case, 40 cm (15 in) blades are going to be quite adequate.
Most hedges need to be trimmed after planting, and then cut twice annually; in spring and late summer. A formal hedge, however, should be clipped more regularly to maintain its form.

A lot of deciduous plants, particularly those with a naturally bushy, low-branching habit should be cut back by one third on planting, as should the evergreens box and shrubby honeysuckle. The very vigorous and upright growers, such as hawthorn and privet, can be cut back to 15 cm (6 in). The year after, each one of these species ought to be clipped lightly, and then cut back by one-third in their second winter. Once the hedge has attained the desired size, trim it back yearly to within 6 mm (1/2 in) of the old wood.

Leyland cypress along with other vigorous conifers are used broadly as hedges. Generally speaking, trim only their side-shoots in the early years, leaving the leading shoots untouched. The most vigorous species may need trimming two or three times in the growing season. Once the leading (apical) shoots have reached the desired height, trim them level to produce a flat-topped, wider-growing hedge.

Many flowering hedges flower on last year's wood, and so may be cut back after flowering. Nevertheless, Japanese rose (Rosa rugosa) ought to be cut back hard in late winter or early spring. Fruiting hedges, such as pyracantha and cotoneaster, may be lightly trimmed either before or after flowering.

Close-leaved evergreen hedges, which do not allow light and rainwater to pass through easily, are best cut to a batter; that is, slightly narrower at the top than bottom. Consequently light can reach the lower areas of the hedge, preventing browning and shedding of the leaves on lower limbs.

Equipment

It's very tough to judge precisely by eye while you are trimming a hedge; it is only when you have finished that any mistakes become obvious. Strings attached to four posts or canes, one at each corner of the hedge and set at the height required, will give a cutting line and help to manage a straight edge.

Most hedges are cut with shears or an electric trimmer, although informal hedges and those with large evergreen leaves ought to, wherever practical, be pruned with secateurs to prevent unsightly damage to the leaves. You should wear heavy-duty gloves and safety glasses when trimming evergreens.

Mains-powered hedge-trimmers must be used with care; they could be incredibly dangerous if mishandled. Always use a 'residual current device' at the socket to cut back the danger of electrocution should you cut the cable. Try and use a hedgetrimmer with a blade stopping time of a maximum of half a second, and a two-handed switch, where the cutter is only going to work when both hands are on it. You can minimise the chance of a hand coming into contact with the blades by utilizing blade extensions. If you have a high and broad hedge you might need 60 cm (24 in) blades; in any other case, 40 cm (15 in) blades are going to be quite adequate.
 



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