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After offering prayers at the Jeshoreshwari Kali Temple in Bangladesh on Saturday, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said he prayed that the human race gets rid

Author : balmu
Publish Date : 2021-03-27 12:24:18
After offering prayers at the Jeshoreshwari Kali Temple in Bangladesh on Saturday, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said he prayed that the human race gets rid

After offering prayers at the Jeshoreshwari Kali Temple in Bangladesh on Saturday, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said he prayed that the human race gets rid

 

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London (CNN) — When 21-year-old Daanish Hussain escaped London for Dubai over the New Year, he did what he does almost every day -- reached for his phone, and documented his journey for his 550,000 followers on TikTok.
His video montage -- which showed him swapping gray skies for sunshine in the United Arab Emirates -- would draw the envy of many Brits, who have been banned from all but essential international travel for months.
But he was far from alone. In recent months, as the UK has sat frozen in lockdown, countless social media stars have posted content from beaches, shopping malls and hotels in Dubai and other favorite hotspots -- many staying in the city despite its own restrictions beginning last month.
"I noticed that a lot of influencers went away -- like, a lot of influencers," Hussain told CNN, admitting he has seen some anger in the comments on his travel videos.
The travels of British influencers haven't escaped the attention of the UK's insatiable tabloids -- screenshots of their foreign parties have been plastered underneath unflattering headlines for weeks.
And influencers don't need to leave home to draw a backlash. Last month, a leading official at the National Health Service (NHS) was forced to urge people not to follow the advice of Gwyneth Paltrow, who wrote on her blog that she eased the effects of long Covid with a variety of superfoods like kombucha and kimchi.
Gwyneth Paltrow was criticized by British health care leaders after writing that certain superfoods helped her combat the effects of Covid-19.
Gwyneth Paltrow was criticized by British health care leaders after writing that certain superfoods helped her combat the effects of Covid-19.
Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic/FilmMagic
But as young people become restless in lockdown, and as the vaccine rollout moves towards millennials, concern is growing from both inside and outside the influencing industry that their laissez-faire approach is rubbing off on followers.
"One of the reasons marketers use celebrities in their campaigns is because they know it has an impact because consumers, particularly young people, want to emulate their behaviours," Linda Bauld, professor of public health at the University of Edinburgh, told CNN on email. "Social media influencers are today's celebrities. They should recognise the responsibility that comes with that and work to promote public health, not undermine it.
"Influencers have got this huge pull -- it's in their very name, they influence," added Keith Herman, whose company Trending Travel uses a network of influencers to promote locations around the world. "You've got to be careful how you use them."
'People look at you as a role model'
The NHS's dismissal of Paltrow's suggestions for dealing with Covid-19 was unexpected, and gave a glimpse at the exasperation among health leaders that young people are seeing the pandemic through the eyes of their online idols.
"Like the virus, misinformation carries across borders and it mutates and it evolves," Stephen Powis, the medical director of NHS England, said after the actress suggested a particular diet had helped with the "brain fog" she experienced after having Covid-19.
"We need to take long Covid seriously and apply serious science. All influencers who use social media have a duty of responsibility and a duty of care around that."
Related content
How Dubai is paying the price for letting in tourists
The UK's Home Secretary Priti Patel had similarly railed against stars taking flights to sunnier locations. "We see plenty of influencers on social media showing off where they are in the world -- mainly sunny places," she said in Parliament, emphasizing that people should simply not be traveling."
But if British media outlets are any indication, the admonishment has not filtered through the influencer community.
"NO SHAME: Brit influencers STILL promoting parties and moan people are 'quick to judge'," The Sun reported last month -- one of a flurry of critical stories. A number of former stars of the popular British reality television show "Love Island" have been heavily criticized by some followers for posting poolside pictures from the city, while one fitness influencer caused a viral backlash after telling ITV she left lockdown for Dubai because her "job is to motivate people."
A glance at the comments on any influencer currently relaxing abroad shows that not everyone feels the same way. "Hard at work! Hope you're enjoying the pandemic," one user wrote under a recent image from former reality TV star James Lock, showing him jet skiing in Dubai. Similar posts from influencers often see a flurry of messages in which fans say they will unfollow the star.
Hussain, who became one of Britain's TikTok stars last year under his handle "its_danzy," insisted the outrage is misplaced. "Some people don't realize that social media's a job," he told CNN.
As for his own reasons to travel, Hussain said he "had to go for business reasons," but also "we were in a 

London (CNN) — When 21-year-old Daanish Hussain escaped London for Dubai over the New Year, he did what he does almost every day -- reached for his phone, and documented his journey for his 550,000 followers on TikTok.
His video montage -- which showed him swapping gray skies for sunshine in the United Arab Emirates -- would draw the envy of many Brits, who have been banned from all but essential international travel for months.
But he was far from alone. In recent months, as the UK has sat frozen in lockdown, countless social media stars have posted content from beaches, shopping malls and hotels in Dubai and other favorite hotspots -- many staying in the city despite its own restrictions beginning last month.
"I noticed that a lot of influencers went away -- like, a lot of influencers," Hussain told CNN, admitting he has seen some anger in the comments on his travel videos.
The travels of British influencers haven't escaped the attention of the UK's insatiable tabloids -- screenshots of their foreign parties have been plastered underneath unflattering headlines for weeks.
And influencers don't need to leave home to draw a backlash. Last month, a leading official at the National Health Service (NHS) was forced to urge people not to follow the advice of Gwyneth Paltrow, who wrote on her blog that she eased the effects of long Covid with a variety of superfoods like kombucha and kimchi.
Gwyneth Paltrow was criticized by British health care leaders after writing that certain superfoods helped her combat the effects of Covid-19.
Gwyneth Paltrow was criticized by British health care leaders after writing that certain superfoods helped her combat the effects of Covid-19.
Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic/FilmMagic
But as young people become restless in lockdown, and as the vaccine rollout moves towards millennials, concern is growing from both inside and outside the influencing industry that their laissez-faire approach is rubbing off on followers.
"One of the reasons marketers use celebrities in their campaigns is because they know it has an impact because consumers, particularly young people, want to emulate their behaviours," Linda Bauld, professor of public health at the University of Edinburgh, told CNN on email. "Social media influencers are today's celebrities. They should recognise the responsibility that comes with that and work to promote public health, not undermine it.
"Influencers have got this huge pull -- it's in their very name, they influence," added Keith Herman, whose company Trending Travel uses a network of influencers to promote locations around the world. "You've got to be careful how you use them."
'People look at you as a role model'
The NHS's dismissal of Paltrow's suggestions for dealing with Covid-19 was unexpected, and gave a glimpse at the exasperation among health leaders that young people are seeing the pandemic through the eyes of their online idols.
"Like the virus, misinformation carries across borders and it mutates and it evolves," Stephen Powis, the medical director of NHS England, said after the actress suggested a particular diet had helped with the "brain fog" she experienced after having Covid-19.
"We need to take long Covid seriously and apply serious science. All influencers who use social media have a duty of responsibility and a duty of care around that."
Related content
How Dubai is paying the price for letting in tourists
The UK's Home Secretary Priti Patel had similarly railed against stars taking flights to sunnier locations. "We see plenty of influencers on social media showing off where they are in the world -- mainly sunny places," she said in Parliament, emphasizing that people should simply not be traveling."
But if British media outlets are any indication, the admonishment has not filtered through the influencer community.
"NO SHAME: Brit influencers STILL promoting parties and moan people are 'quick to judge'," The Sun reported last month -- one of a flurry of critical stories. A number of former stars of the popular British reality television show "Love Island" have been heavily criticized by some followers for posting poolside pictures from the city, while one fitness influencer caused a viral backlash after telling ITV she left lockdown for Dubai because her "job is to motivate people."
A glance at the comments on any influencer currently relaxing abroad shows that not everyone feels the same way. "Hard at work! Hope you're enjoying the pandemic," one user wrote under a recent image from former reality TV star James Lock, showing him jet skiing in Dubai. Similar posts from influencers often see a flurry of messages in which fans say they will unfollow the star.
Hussain, who became one of Britain's TikTok stars last year under his handle "its_danzy," insisted the outrage is misplaced. "Some people don't realize that social media's a job," he told CNN.
As for his own reasons to travel, Hussain said he "had to go for business reasons," but also "we were in a 



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