DreamPirates DreamPirates

Journalists Are Being Beaten in Myanmar for Reporting on Military Coup

Author : aneskahahaha
Publish Date : 2021-04-14 09:31:31
Journalists Are Being Beaten in Myanmar for Reporting on Military Coup

Seorang pembawa berita CNN mengatakan "dunia beruntung" memiliki koresponden bintang jaringan yang meliput kekerasan setelah kudeta. Benarkah?
Itu setara jurnalistik dengan memenangkan lotere. Lebih dari dua bulan setelah kudeta menjerumuskan Myanmar ke dalam kekacauan, CNN berhasil mengamankan akses ke negara itu. Jaringan itu mengirim koresponden asing yang berbasis di London dan timnya ke Yangon, menjadikan mereka kru internasional pertama yang terbang sejak pengambilalihan militer pada 1 Februari.

https://video-images.vice.com/_uncategorized/1617849183216-0009383wz.jpeg?resize=800:*</s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> </s> orang </s>

https://mcook.instructure.com/eportfolios/33571/Home/_2021ZH__The_Story_of_Southern_Islet_HD1080P
https://mcook.instructure.com/eportfolios/33572/Home/_2021__
https://mcook.instructure.com/eportfolios/33575/Home/TW_The_Story_of_Southern_Islet_
https://mcook.instructure.com/eportfolios/33576/Home/_20211080P_
https://mcook.instructure.com/eportfolios/33574/Home/


Myanmar security forces have killed some 550 civilians, leaving desperate anti-coup protesters to call on the United Nations to intervene. After all, who could possibly shine a light on the country’s struggles if not CNN?

At least, that’s what viewers of the segment that aired this week were led to believe by the network itself.

“The world is lucky” to have Clarissa Ward in Myanmar, anchor John Berman told primetime viewers. In another on-air exchange, Jake Tapper showered praise on his CNN colleague. “Really appreciate your courage,” he told Ward before ending the interview by holding up the three-finger “Hunger Games” protest salute.

But as CNN patted itself on the back for landing a prized story, it has also attracted criticism for self-aggrandizement, dubious methods and endangering the very people whose plights it sought to emphasize.

Eleven residents in Yangon were reportedly detained by Myanmar security forces soon after they spoke to Ward. At least eight were later released, CNN confirmed.

The stakes were high. In their attempt to clamp down on opposition, Myanmar security forces have killed some 550 civilians, leaving desperate anti-coup protesters to call on the United Nations to intervene. After all, who could possibly shine a light on the country’s struggles if not CNN?

At least, that’s what viewers of the segment that aired this week were led to believe by the network itself.


“The world is lucky” to have Clarissa Ward in Myanmar, anchor John Berman told primetime viewers. In another on-air exchange, Jake Tapper showered praise on his CNN colleague. “Really appreciate your courage,” he told Ward before ending the interview by holding up the three-finger “Hunger Games” protest salute.


But as CNN patted itself on the back for landing a prized story, it has also attracted criticism for self-aggrandizement, dubious methods and endangering the very people whose plights it sought to emphasize.

Eleven residents in Yangon were reportedly detained by Myanmar security forces soon after they spoke to Ward. At least eight were later released, CNN confirmed.Critics said the network’s heroic portrayal of itself glossed over the tireless work of plenty of journalists on the ground in Myanmar as well as elsewhere in Asia. Unlike Ward, they did not have protection or blessings by the junta to do their jobs but still continued to risk their lives to document the abuses of security forces.

Local news outlets including English-language sites Myanmar Now and Frontier Myanmar have been delivering vital coverage of their country since day one – sometimes literally putting themselves in the line of fire to document the bloody crackdowns on protesters. A Frontier photo journalist was shot through the palm of his left hand while attempting to protect three children from a bullet.

World News
This 3-Year-Old Survived an Airstrike in Myanmar. His Father Didn’t.
CALEB QUINLEY
03.30.21

Twenty-nine journalists in Myanmar remain in detention, according to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners monitoring group. An additional 21 were held and released, the group added, while a smaller number were in hiding after arrest warrants were issued.

A new generation of citizen journalists from the country has also proven to be invaluable, providing eyewitness clips, testimonies and striking images despite intimidation and internet crackdownz

Critics said the network’s heroic portrayal of itself glossed over the tireless work of plenty of journalists on the ground in Myanmar as well as elsewhere in Asia. Unlike Ward, they did not have protection or blessings by the junta to do their jobs but still continued to risk their lives to document the abuses of security forces.

Local news outlets including English-language sites Myanmar Now and Frontier Myanmar have been delivering vital coverage of their country since day one – sometimes literally putting themselves in the line of fire to document the bloody crackdowns on protesters. A Frontier photo journalist was shot through the palm of his left hand while attempting to protect three children from a bullet.

Twenty-nine journalists in Myanmar remain in detention, according to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners monitoring group. An additional 21 were held and released, the group added, while a smaller number were in hiding after arrest warrants were issued.

A new generation of citizen journalists from the country has also proven to be invaluable, providing eyewitness clips, testimonies and striking images despite intimidation and internet crackdowns.

“CNN had the spotlight but chose to ignore the work of our local Burmese journalists, as well as others on the ground, who have been risking their safety every day to get information out there to the rest of the world,” Theo Htet, a Burmese citizen living in Singapore, told VICE World News.

mention that it wasn’t the only media outlet that was granted access for the trip. The much smaller English-language news magazine Southeast Asia Globe also joined, but stayed well out of the spotlight until after the trip ended. And CNN didn’t delve into the details of how they managed to get into Myanmar in the first place when other foreign journalists have not been allowed to come and go freely after the coup.

According to Reuters, the trip was arranged by Israeli-Canadian lobbyist Ari Ben-Menashe, who was paid $2 million by the junta to “assist in explaining the real situation” that was happening in the country.
The self-congratulation and omissions didn’t sit well with journalists and critics in Southeast Asian media who described CNN’s reporting mission as “parachute journalism”. Some even mocked Ward for being a “celebrity white savior” who took credit for doing a job that others in cities across the country had been doing for months.

Phyo, a 25-year-old anti-coup activist from Yangon, took issue with her team’s approach to the coup, saying that the network could have just collaborated more with journalists already on the ground, adding on to what the network’s digital team had already been doing in their online coverage.

“When you are a journalist, you are meant to be reporting the news, you are not the news. But in this situation, Clarissa Ward and CNN became the news,” she said.


“CNN did not report anything new. Their story was more centered on their privilege to come into our country with the blessing of the Tatmadaw [Myanmar’s army] when other foreign media could not.”

One Myanmar photographer covering the protests, who preferred to remain anonymous for security reasons, said that Ward’s visit was “good” because it had the potential to raise awareness about the situation. CNN, after all, has a huge audience and reaches people even front-page coverage in American newspapers can’t.

But she also pointed out that it overshadowed contributions by local journalists, including those who had been contributing to CNN.

“This is something that I don’t quite like, which is that many people here on social media, including my friends, don’t know that our local journalists are filing stories to foreign desks,” she said. “So the CNN visit was like a special thing for local people. But our colleagues have been working for CNN already from here.”

Thailand correspondent for CNA, Saksith Saiyasombut, drew parallels between CNN’s trip with the media frenzy around the 2018 rescue of a youth soccer team from a Thai cave. Hordes of foreign reporters and crew descended upon a small town in northern Thailand, eager for scoops and sometimes blurring ethical boundaries.

“Some parachuted colleagues crossed a line and invaded the privacy of the kids’ family – but we locals from domestic and international media had to bear the brunt of it,” he wrote, referring to authorities’ heightened scrutiny of correspondents based in the country.

Anger over the Myanmar trip peaked when Ward hit back at her critics at the end of the government-guided tour, blaming “a handful of white male academics/commentators” for calling her out. She ignored criticisms by residents and journalists around the region.

CNN also did not respond to a request for comment on Wednesday from VICE World News.

But the network’s presence had been warmly welcomed by some locals craving more international attention to their cause, including those advocating for intervention from bodies such as the United Nations and the U.S. government. Many on social media expressed gratitude and admiration to Ward and her crew, as she pointed out. Some banged pots and pans when she arrived in a show of defiance to the military.

But to many journalists in Asia, the fallout from Ward’s trip showed a reckoning with the system of foreign correspondents – which has a history of relegating talented local reporters to roles like fixers, translators and news assistants, making a fraction of what their Western counterparts earn but taking most of the risks – was long overdue.
Phyo, a 25-year-old anti-coup activist from Yangon, took issue with her team’s approach to the coup, saying that the network could have just collaborated more with journalists already on the ground, adding on to what the network’s digital team had already been doing in their online coverage.

“When you are a journalist, you are meant to be reporting the news, you are not the news. But in this situation, Clarissa Ward and CNN became the news,” she said.


“CNN did not report anything new. Their story was more centered on their privilege to come into our country with the blessing of the Tatmadaw [Myanmar’s army] when other foreign media could not.”

One Myanmar photographer covering the protests, who preferred to remain anonymous for security reasons, said that Ward’s visit was “good” because it had the potential



Category : general

Most Well-liked Internet Slot machine games

Most Well-liked Internet Slot machine games

- what your location is contemplating using your certification study course, to learn. They will surely know the requirements and be able to give you


Pruning Basics - Lesson #2 - The Function of Pruning

Pruning Basics - Lesson #2 - The Function of Pruning

- When we prune a plant, we are trying to accomplish one or more objectives associated with plant health, appearance or safety. The act of pruning is also very re


Genuine & Authentic 200-301 Exam Questions 100% Real 2021

Genuine & Authentic 200-301 Exam Questions 100% Real 2021

- Dumpsfortest.com has a team of experts and they work hard to see our clients successful. We offer the course in a good presentation.


Manage All These Elements Before Buying Dalmatian Puppies As Your Family Dog

Manage All These Elements Before Buying Dalmatian Puppies As Your Family Dog

- We are a family dedicated to ensuring that Dalmatian Puppies receive correct nourishment and care in order to live longer, happier