DreamPirates DreamPirates

Education In Developing Countries

Author : barbarapeterson012
Publish Date : 2021-04-12 11:58:08
Education In Developing Countries

How do developing countries handle education amid the more pressing everyday challenges imposed by economic pressures and threats to security, law and order?

Certainly, there are more serious problems to face, but it is significant to note that education is not forgotten. For many, it is still the best way to overcome hardship and poverty. However elusive, it is still considered the key to a better life.

Among developing countries that are classified as "emerging markets," it is not surprising to see educational institutions that are world-class and which offer education that can rival that provided by wealthier nations around the world. These include such countries as Mexico, India, Brazil, Turkey, the Philippines, Egypt, South Africa, Malaysia, Thailand, much of South America and several of the Persian Gulf Arab States.

Unfortunately, although world-class education is readily available, it is still beyond reach for a significant portion of the population of these countries.

At the lowest spectrum of the economic scale, it is not surprising to see a low view of the importance of education as parents tend to prioritize their children's ability to make money over the longer-term benefits of schooling. But studies have shown that when poor families reach a certain economic threshold where their basic needs are met, their next priority is to put their children in school. Their next concern usually is where to get their kids a decent education since many public schools have low educational standards, which is understandable considering that teachers are often paid a lot less than in other similar professions. On the other hand, when they do find a school they like, they have to move heaven and earth to get their kids into that school because of low acceptance rates.

There are encouraging trends. For instance, India has launched EDUSAT, an education satellite that can reach more of the country at a greatly reduced cost. There are also initiatives to develop a $100 laptop to make laptops available to most students by late 2006 or 2007 in order to give their children a digital education. Africa has also launched an "e-school programme" to provide all 600,000 primary and high schools with computer equipment, learning materials and internet access within 10 years. Other countries have simialr initiatives along these same lines.

 

https://portal.uaptc.edu/ICS/Campus_Life/Campus_Groups/Art_Club/Discussion.jnz?portlet=Forums&screen=PostView&screenType=change&id=22960db8-4c33-42eb-9317-f92ab537ffb6
https://portal.uaptc.edu/ICS/Campus_Life/Campus_Groups/Art_Club/Discussion.jnz?portlet=Forums&screen=PostView&screenType=change&id=1b89d161-c6d5-4506-a645-1d91c94adea4
https://portal.uaptc.edu/ICS/Campus_Life/Campus_Groups/Art_Club/Discussion.jnz?portlet=Forums&screen=PostView&screenType=change&id=11c8c688-21a8-4477-ba27-5f9aa339c536
https://portal.uaptc.edu/ICS/Campus_Life/Campus_Groups/Art_Club/Discussion.jnz?portlet=Forums&screen=PostView&screenType=change&id=3399471e-7c64-4ccb-8e56-069849f1f605
https://portal.uaptc.edu/ICS/Campus_Life/Campus_Groups/Art_Club/Discussion.jnz?portlet=Forums&screen=PostView&screenType=change&id=34f25d7b-fcaa-4607-a8b1-ce26a7734e0b


How do developing countries handle education amid the more pressing everyday challenges imposed by economic pressures and threats to security, law and order?

Certainly, there are more serious problems to face, but it is significant to note that education is not forgotten. For many, it is still the best way to overcome hardship and poverty. However elusive, it is still considered the key to a better life.

Among developing countries that are classified as "emerging markets," it is not surprising to see educational institutions that are world-class and which offer education that can rival that provided by wealthier nations around the world. These include such countries as Mexico, India, Brazil, Turkey, the Philippines, Egypt, South Africa, Malaysia, Thailand, much of South America and several of the Persian Gulf Arab States.

Unfortunately, although world-class education is readily available, it is still beyond reach for a significant portion of the population of these countries.

At the lowest spectrum of the economic scale, it is not surprising to see a low view of the importance of education as parents tend to prioritize their children's ability to make money over the longer-term benefits of schooling. But studies have shown that when poor families reach a certain economic threshold where their basic needs are met, their next priority is to put their children in school. Their next concern usually is where to get their kids a decent education since many public schools have low educational standards, which is understandable considering that teachers are often paid a lot less than in other similar professions. On the other hand, when they do find a school they like, they have to move heaven and earth to get their kids into that school because of low acceptance rates.

There are encouraging trends. For instance, India has launched EDUSAT, an education satellite that can reach more of the country at a greatly reduced cost. There are also initiatives to develop a $100 laptop to make laptops available to most students by late 2006 or 2007 in order to give their children a digital education. Africa has also launched an "e-school programme" to provide all 600,000 primary and high schools with computer equipment, learning materials and internet access within 10 years. Other countries have simialr initiatives along these same lines.
How do developing countries handle education amid the more pressing everyday challenges imposed by economic pressures and threats to security, law and order?

Certainly, there are more serious problems to face, but it is significant to note that education is not forgotten. For many, it is still the best way to overcome hardship and poverty. However elusive, it is still considered the key to a better life.

Among developing countries that are classified as "emerging markets," it is not surprising to see educational institutions that are world-class and which offer education that can rival that provided by wealthier nations around the world. These include such countries as Mexico, India, Brazil, Turkey, the Philippines, Egypt, South Africa, Malaysia, Thailand, much of South America and several of the Persian Gulf Arab States.

Unfortunately, although world-class education is readily available, it is still beyond reach for a significant portion of the population of these countries.

At the lowest spectrum of the economic scale, it is not surprising to see a low view of the importance of education as parents tend to prioritize their children's ability to make money over the longer-term benefits of schooling. But studies have shown that when poor families reach a certain economic threshold where their basic needs are met, their next priority is to put their children in school. Their next concern usually is where to get their kids a decent education since many public schools have low educational standards, which is understandable considering that teachers are often paid a lot less than in other similar professions. On the other hand, when they do find a school they like, they have to move heaven and earth to get their kids into that school because of low acceptance rates.

There are encouraging trends. For instance, India has launched EDUSAT, an education satellite that can reach more of the country at a greatly reduced cost. There are also initiatives to develop a $100 laptop to make laptops available to most students by late 2006 or 2007 in order to give their children a digital education. Africa has also launched an "e-school programme" to provide all 600,000 primary and high schools with computer equipment, learning materials and internet access within 10 years. Other countries have simialr initiatives along these same lines.



Category : general

Cisco Router Security Basics

Cisco Router Security Basics

- Just like the old telephone operators and the old style telephone exchange where they put certain plugs into certain sockets in order to connect to certain peop


You might be asking yourself how to go about this education process

You might be asking yourself how to go about this education process

- Check out the high schools and colleges in your area and inquire about continuing education courses, free courses and free courses at any city buildings


In fact, Henry Ward Beecher was a master of accomplishment,

In fact, Henry Ward Beecher was a master of accomplishment,

- A note about worry: Even though worry seems like its inevitable, in fact, its mostly a habit. Most things you worry about will never happen


Choosing Online Massage Therapy Continuing Education Courses

Choosing Online Massage Therapy Continuing Education Courses

- A Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is similar to a credit, in that a specific amount must be accrued to meet the requirements for maintaining a certification-jus