Ciscos Fascination With Video and the Apple iPad

Author : Elizabeth Huston789
Publish Date : 2021-04-17 10:15:23
Ciscos Fascination With Video and the Apple iPad

I was at the Cisco partner conference last week, where the Cisco executives were discussing the technology trends for the next three to five years, and how they are positioning Cisco in order to help build for the future.

Most of the presentations were centered around the coming video explosion, and how it is going to fundamentally change business communications. With a predication that 90% of all network traffic is going to be video by 2015, the main point driven home again and again by Cisco execs is that LAN's, WAN's, and the Internet have to be sized, scaled, and prioritized to handle this huge volume of video traffic.

Furthermore, this video is going to be in the form of live videoconferencing at multiple definitions and formats concurrently, recorded video uploaded for training purposes, and video from surveillance cameras that is going to be used for marketing, training, and all sorts of other purposes. As part of this, the Cisco Show and Share product will take an uploaded video, convert text to speech, then index every word for later searching and play.

What puzzled me was the endless fascination with the Apple iPad. It was used as part of multiple presentations, and there was downright fawning over the product from just about every executive. It was very puzzling, and somewhat troubling. I certainly don't expect that at an Apple sales conference the executives are hyping the Cisco CRS-3 as the answer to how to scale iTunes.

After a few days of thought, however, I think I understand how the next version of the iPad is going to be the one device that brings more product and service revenue to Cisco than anything else. When the next iPad comes out, it will have front and back video cameras. If Cisco or Apple has an Apple that securely ties into Cisco/Tandberg videoconferencing system (probably with Cisco TrustSec and the Anyconnect client), the iPad will be able to be a secure anytime HD videoconferencing endpoint.

Of course, it can also be used to create quick videos for upload. This one device may drive the most video traffic of any system on the planet!

Author: Rolf Versluis

Adcap Network Systems - Atlanta and Miami - Great Local Engineers  Network Security, Server and Desktop Virtualization
I was at the Cisco partner conference last week, where the Cisco executives were discussing the technology trends for the next three to five years, and how they are positioning Cisco in order to help build for the future.

Most of the presentations were centered around the coming video explosion, and how it is going to fundamentally change business communications. With a predication that 90% of all network traffic is going to be video by 2015, the main point driven home again and again by Cisco execs is that LAN's, WAN's, and the Internet have to be sized, scaled, and prioritized to handle this huge volume of video traffic.

Furthermore, this video is going to be in the form of live videoconferencing at multiple definitions and formats concurrently, recorded video uploaded for training purposes, and video from surveillance cameras that is going to be used for marketing, training, and all sorts of other purposes. As part of this, the Cisco Show and Share product will take an uploaded video, convert text to speech, then index every word for later searching and play.

What puzzled me was the endless fascination with the Apple iPad. It was used as part of multiple presentations, and there was downright fawning over the product from just about every executive. It was very puzzling, and somewhat troubling. I certainly don't expect that at an Apple sales conference the executives are hyping the Cisco CRS-3 as the answer to how to scale iTunes.

After a few days of thought, however, I think I understand how the next version of the iPad is going to be the one device that brings more product and service revenue to Cisco than anything else. When the next iPad comes out, it will have front and back video cameras. If Cisco or Apple has an Apple that securely ties into Cisco/Tandberg videoconferencing system (probably with Cisco TrustSec and the Anyconnect client), the iPad will be able to be a secure anytime HD videoconferencing endpoint.

Of course, it can also be used to create quick videos for upload. This one device may drive the most video traffic of any system on the planet!

Author: Rolf Versluis

Adcap Network Systems - Atlanta and Miami - Great Local Engineers  Network Security, Server and Desktop Virtualization
I was at the Cisco partner conference last week, where the Cisco executives were discussing the technology trends for the next three to five years, and how they are positioning Cisco in order to help build for the future.

 

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Most of the presentations were centered around the coming video explosion, and how it is going to fundamentally change business communications. With a predication that 90% of all network traffic is going to be video by 2015, the main point driven home again and again by Cisco execs is that LAN's, WAN's, and the Internet have to be sized, scaled, and prioritized to handle this huge volume of video traffic.

Furthermore, this video is going to be in the form of live videoconferencing at multiple definitions and formats concurrently, recorded video uploaded for training purposes, and video from surveillance cameras that is going to be used for marketing, training, and all sorts of other purposes. As part of this, the Cisco Show and Share product will take an uploaded video, convert text to speech, then index every word for later searching and play.

What puzzled me was the endless fascination with the Apple iPad. It was used as part of multiple presentations, and there was downright fawning over the product from just about every executive. It was very puzzling, and somewhat troubling. I certainly don't expect that at an Apple sales conference the executives are hyping the Cisco CRS-3 as the answer to how to scale iTunes.

After a few days of thought, however, I think I understand how the next version of the iPad is going to be the one device that brings more product and service revenue to Cisco than anything else. When the next iPad comes out, it will have front and back video cameras. If Cisco or Apple has an Apple that securely ties into Cisco/Tandberg videoconferencing system (probably with Cisco TrustSec and the Anyconnect client), the iPad will be able to be a secure anytime HD videoconferencing endpoint.

Of course, it can also be used to create quick videos for upload. This one device may drive the most video traffic of any system on the planet!

Author: Rolf Versluis

Adcap Network Systems - Atlanta and Miami - Great Local Engineers  Network Security, Server and Desktop Virtualization



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