How Indian-Americans View US And Indian Policies: Report

Author : lahoregreenz
Publish Date : 2021-02-09 12:19:44
How Indian-Americans View US And Indian Policies: Report

New Delhi: Indian-Americans hold "relatively more conservative" views on Indian policies - such as those affecting protection of religious minorities, immigration and affirmative active - than American ones, according to a report based on a survey of the community in September last year. The report - a collaboration between the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Johns Hopkins-SAIS, and the University of Pennsylvania - draws on data from an online survey of 1,200 adult Indian Americans. The survey has an overall margin of error of +/- 2.8 per cent. As an example, 90 per cent of respondents supported treating members of all faiths equally. Of these, 60 per cent expressed opposition to the 'Muslim travel ban' imposed by Donald Trump but only 49 per cent opposed the Indian government's controversial citizenship law (CAA). Similarly, 69 per cent supported more the idea of liberal immigration policies. However, only 45 per cent indicated they were opposed to the equally controversial all-India NRC exercise proposed by the Indian government. 55 per cent supported less stringent policies in the United States. To questions on ethnic majoritarianism, 53 per cent see Hindu majoritarianism as a threat to minorities in India. However, 73 per cent view white supremacy as a similar threat in the US. "Indian Americans... believe white supremacy is a greater threat to minorities in the US, a country where they are a minority, than Hindu majoritarianism is to minorities in India, a country where Hindus (the most common faith of Indian Americans) are in the majority," the report says. Analysing that response - by religious faith is "instructive" the report adds, pointing out that while 70 per cent of Hindus and (79 per cent of non-Hindus) see white supremacy as a threat, only 40 per cent see Hindu majoritarianism as a similar threat, compared to 67 per cent of non-Hindus. The survey also asked respondents for the top three challenges India faces today. Government corruption topped that list with 18 per cent of responses, with the condition of the economy narrowly behind at 15 per cent. Religious majoritarianism was third with 10 per cent.

New Delhi: Indian-Americans hold "relatively more conservative" views on Indian policies - such as those affecting protection of religious minorities, immigration and affirmative active - than American ones, according to a report based on a survey of the community in September last year. The report - a collaboration between the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Johns Hopkins-SAIS, and the University of Pennsylvania - draws on data from an online survey of 1,200 adult Indian Americans. The survey has an overall margin of error of +/- 2.8 per cent. As an example, 90 per cent of respondents supported treating members of all faiths equally. Of these, 60 per cent expressed opposition to the 'Muslim travel ban' imposed by Donald Trump but only 49 per cent opposed the Indian government's controversial citizenship law (CAA). Similarly, 69 per cent supported more the idea of liberal immigration policies. However, only 45 per cent indicated they were opposed to the equally controversial all-India NRC exercise proposed by the Indian government. 55 per cent supported less stringent policies in the United States. To questions on ethnic majoritarianism, 53 per cent see Hindu majoritarianism as a threat to minorities in India. However, 73 per cent view white supremacy as a similar threat in the US. "Indian Americans... believe white supremacy is a greater threat to minorities in the US, a country where they are a minority, than Hindu majoritarianism is to minorities in India, a country where Hindus (the most common faith of Indian Americans) are in the majority," the report says. Analysing that response - by religious faith is "instructive" the report adds, pointing out that while 70 per cent of Hindus and (79 per cent of non-Hindus) see white supremacy as a threat, only 40 per cent see Hindu majoritarianism as a similar threat, compared to 67 per cent of non-Hindus. The survey also asked respondents for the top three challenges India faces today. Government corruption topped that list with 18 per cent of responses, with the condition of the economy narrowly behind at 15 per cent. Religious majoritarianism was third with 10 per cent.

New Delhi: Indian-Americans hold "relatively more conservative" views on Indian policies - such as those affecting protection of religious minorities, immigration and affirmative active - than American ones, according to a report based on a survey of the community in September last year. The report - a collaboration between the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Johns Hopkins-SAIS, and the University of Pennsylvania - draws on data from an online survey of 1,200 adult Indian Americans. The survey has an overall margin of error of +/- 2.8 per cent. As an example, 90 per cent of respondents supported treating members of all faiths equally. Of these, 60 per cent expressed opposition to the 'Muslim travel ban' imposed by Donald Trump but only 49 per cent opposed the Indian government's controversial citizenship law (CAA). Similarly, 69 per cent supported more the idea of liberal immigration policies. However, only 45 per cent indicated they were opposed to the equally controversial all-India NRC exercise proposed by the Indian government. 55 per cent supported less stringent policies in the United States. To questions on ethnic majoritarianism, 53 per cent see Hindu majoritarianism as a threat to minorities in India. However, 73 per cent view white supremacy as a similar threat in the US. "Indian Americans... believe white supremacy is a greater threat to minorities in the US, a country where they are a minority, than Hindu majoritarianism is to minorities in India, a country where Hindus (the most common faith of Indian Americans) are in the majority," the report says. Analysing that response - by religious faith is "instructive" the report adds, pointing out that while 70 per cent of Hindus and (79 per cent of non-Hindus) see white supremacy as a threat, only 40 per cent see Hindu majoritarianism as a similar threat, compared to 67 per cent of non-Hindus. The survey also asked respondents for the top three challenges India faces today. Government corruption topped that list with 18 per cent of responses, with the condition of the economy narrowly behind at 15 per cent. Religious majoritarianism was third with 10 per cent.

New Delhi: Indian-Americans hold "relatively more conservative" views on Indian policies - such as those affecting protection of religious minorities, immigration and affirmative active - than American ones, according to a report based on a survey of the community in September last year. The report - a collaboration between the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Johns Hopkins-SAIS, and the University of Pennsylvania - draws on data from an online survey of 1,200 adult Indian Americans. The survey has an overall margin of error of +/- 2.8 per cent. As an example, 90 per cent of respondents supported treating members of all faiths equally. Of these, 60 per cent expressed opposition to the 'Muslim travel ban' imposed by Donald Trump but only 49 per cent opposed the Indian government's controversial citizenship law (CAA). Similarly, 69 per cent supported more the idea of liberal immigration policies. However, only 45 per cent indicated they were opposed to the equally controversial all-India NRC exercise proposed by the Indian government. 55 per cent supported less stringent policies in the United States. To questions on ethnic majoritarianism, 53 per cent see Hindu majoritarianism as a threat to minorities in India. However, 73 per cent view white supremacy as a similar threat in the US. "Indian Americans... believe white supremacy is a greater threat to minorities in the US, a country where they are a minority, than Hindu majoritarianism is to minorities in India, a country where Hindus (the most common faith of Indian Americans) are in the majority," the report says. Analysing that response - by religious faith is "instructive" the report adds, pointing out that while 70 per cent of Hindus and (79 per cent of non-Hindus) see white supremacy as a threat, only 40 per cent see Hindu majoritarianism as a similar threat, compared to 67 per cent of non-Hindus. The survey also asked respondents for the top three challenges India faces today. Government corruption topped that list with 18 per cent of responses, with the condition of the economy narrowly behind at 15 per cent. Religious majoritarianism was third with 10 per cent.

New Delhi: Indian-Americans hold "relatively more conservative" views on Indian policies - such as those affecting protection of religious minorities, immigration and affirmative active - than American ones, according to a report based on a survey of the community in September last year. The report - a collaboration between the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Johns Hopkins-SAIS, and the University of Pennsylvania - draws on data from an online survey of 1,200 adult Indian Americans. The survey has an overall margin of error of +/- 2.8 per cent. As an example, 90 per cent of respondents supported treating members of all faiths equally. Of these, 60 per cent expressed opposition to the 'Muslim travel ban' imposed by Donald Trump but only 49 per cent opposed the Indian government's controversial citizenship law (CAA). Similarly, 69 per cent supported more the idea of liberal immigration policies. However, only 45 per cent indicated they were opposed to the equally controversial all-India NRC exercise proposed by the Indian government. 55 per cent supported less stringent policies in the United States. To questions on ethnic majoritarianism, 53 per cent see Hindu majoritarianism as a threat to minorities in India. However, 73 per cent view white supremacy as a similar threat in the US. "Indian Americans... believe white supremacy is a greater threat to minorities in the US, a country where they are a minority, than Hindu majoritarianism is to minorities in India, a country where Hindus (the most common faith of Indian Americans) are in the majority," the report says. Analysing that response - by religious faith is "instructive" the report adds, pointing out that while 70 per cent of Hindus and (79 per cent of non-Hindus) see white supremacy as a threat, only 40 per cent see Hindu majoritarianism as a similar threat, compared to 67 per cent of non-Hindus. The survey also asked respondents for the top three challenges India faces today. Government corruption topped that list with 18 per cent of responses, with the condition of the economy narrowly behind at 15 per cent. Religious majoritarianism was third with 10 per cent.

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